Supportive Studies
and Additional Research

This isn’t new information. There are many studies supporting our conclusions.

“…sensory-induced behavior associated with the physical inter-action of the plantar surface with the ground (in the unshod), or the footwear and underlying surface (in shod), is considered unimportant to the traditional thesis. This omission is astounding because logically, the plantar surface, being a highly sensitive layer, would produce significant sensations in either state, and it is common knowledge that noxious plantar skin sensation can easily induce avoidance behavior…” Robbins SE, Hanna AM, Gouw GJ. Overload Protection: Avoidance Response to Heavy Plantar Surface Loading. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 20(1): p. 85, February 1988.

“The barefoot walker receives a continuous stream of information about the ground and about his relationship to it, while a shod foot sleeps inside an unchanging environment. Sensations that are not listened to become decayed and atrophy.” Platte B. San Francisco Chronicle Interview with Dr. P.W. Brand. Medical Research. www.unshod.org/pfbc/pfmedresearch.html: 1976

“…the arch develops during the first decade of life… … shoes increase the frequency of flat feet (studies from India suggest that shoes actually cause flat feet)…” Dr. James G. Wright, Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto Faculty. The Hospital for Sick Children. Foot and Ankle Symposium Co-sponsored by the Canadian Orthopaedic Association and the Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Division University of Toronto, held at Sunnybrook Hospital, April 1996

“The inescapable conclusion is that footwear use is ultimately responsible for ankle injury.” Robbins SE, Waked E, Rappel R. Taping Improves Proprioception Before and After Exercise in Young Men. British Journal of Sports Medicine 29(4): p. 242,1995

“…current treatment of foot disorders is limited…” Dr. Roger A. Mann, Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Surgery, University of California at San Francisco. Foot and Ankle Symposium Co-sponsored by the Canadian Orthopaedic Association and the Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Division, University of Toronto, held at Sunnybrook Hospital, April 1996

“…consistent use of (shock absorbing) orthotic inserts did not prevent lower limb pain among healthy soldiers in basic training…” Sherman RA, Karstetter KW, May H, Woerman AL. Prevention of Lower Limb Pain in Soldiers Using Shock-Absorbing Orthotic Inserts. Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association, Volume 86, No. 3, March 1996

“Shock absorbing materials in the shoe are not required if subtalar joint function is normal.” Tiberio D. The Effect of Excessive Subtalar Joint Pronation on Patellofemoral Mechanics: A Theoretical Model. Journal of Orthopedic & Sports Physical Therapy 9(4): p. 160, 1987.

“We should have a clear body of evidence that orthoses actually work. Unfortunately we don’t.” Hamill J, Derrick TR. Orthoses: Foot/Custom: The Mechanics of Foot Orthoses for Runners. Biomechanics: February 1996

“…the results of a two-year prospective randomized national study on the treatment of heel pain. The study found inexpensive off-the-shelf shoe inserts to be more effective than plastic custom arch supports in the initial treatment of heel pain (plantar fasciitis).” Glenn Pfeffer, M.D., San Francisco, Chairman of the AOFAS Heel Pain Study Group, American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) 1996

No one method for measuring STJ neutral has been proven accurate and reproducible by different testers.” Miller M, McGuire J. Literature Reveals No Consensus on Subtalar Neutral. Biomechanics: p. 63, August 2000

“…the development of a prophylactic orthotic would be of great benefit in the prevention and treatment of foot disorders.” Dr. Roger A. Mann, Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Surgery, University of California at San Francisco. Foot and Ankle Symposium Co-sponsored by the Canadian Orthopaedic Association and the Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Division, University of Toronto, held at Sunnybrook Hospital, April 1996

“The experimental changes of shortening of the medial arch and load redistribution to the digits can only be explained by an activation of this normally inactive musculature associated with increased barefoot weight-bearing activity.

The data clearly demonstrates that the normally shod foot is capable of rehabilitation of foot musculature.” Robbins SE, Gouw JG, Hanna AM. Running Related Injury Prevention Through Innate Impact-Moderating Behaviour. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 21(2): p. 1390, 1987 (American College of Sports Medicine).

Additional References

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Learn More About the Science Behind BioPods

Foot Care
Overview

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Functional Adaptation of the Human Body and Natural Laws

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Neuromuscular Function and Gait Mechanics

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Supportive Studies and Additional Research

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